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Three more defibs in Bishop's Stortford town centre as Brian's mission takes hold




Jackson Square, Bishops Stortford. Brian Goodwin demonstrates CPR and how to use the new defibrulator that will be in Jackson Square. Front l-r: Julie North (Hanbury Wealth and Rachel Hall (Next) get the training as others watch. Pic: Vikki Lince
Jackson Square, Bishops Stortford. Brian Goodwin demonstrates CPR and how to use the new defibrulator that will be in Jackson Square. Front l-r: Julie North (Hanbury Wealth and Rachel Hall (Next) get the training as others watch. Pic: Vikki Lince

People who suffer a cardiac arrest in Bishop's Stortford town centre now stand a better chance of survival as a result of three life-saving machines being installed.

One of the automated external defibrillators (AEDs) has been installed in the Jackson Square shopping centre, near the travelators. It was paid for by Hockerill Street financial advisers Hanbury Wealth.

A second has been funded by the Market Square-based law firm, Nockolds and set up outside its office.

The third is in the red phone box in Potter Street, at the top of the steps to Devoils Lane. This AED was brought into fruition by the town council and the Herts and Essex Community Charity provided the life-saving piece of equipment.

Health and safety trainer Brian Goodwin is on a mission to improve arrest victims’ chances of survival following the death of a man in the Waitrose car park last year.

As part of his ‘Save a Life’ campaign, Brian, 56, of Kingsbridge Road in Stortford, has been working to publicise the locations of publicly accessible defibrillators in the town and to encourage businesses and community hubs to get behind the initiative. As a result, Hanbury Wealth and Nockolds offered to buy machines.

Brian unveiled Jackson Square’s defib on Tuesday last week. The former Army medic taught 25 shoppers and workers how to use the machine and how to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

“A few members of the public came along, including a teacher I’ve taught before who brought two youngsters along who practised,” he said. “A few elderly people attended and were keen to deal with CPR and choking as they babysit their grandchildren.”

Brian, who runs Pegasus Health and Safety Training, had hoped to train staff at all the Jackson Square shops how to use the defib, but he was disappointed with the turnout; Next was the only one that sent along employees. “It’s a shame as the defib is there partly to save their staff’s lives, and some shops didn’t tell or let their staff attend,” he said.

But staff from Hanbury Wealth, Nockolds and Dane Street accountants Price Bailey made use of Brian’s free life-saving tutorials.



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