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Stortford and Much Hadham schools come together as festival choir at Rhodes



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Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishops Stortford. KS2 Schools concert. Pupils from Windhill21, Summercroft, St Andrews and St Michaels Primary schools taking part in concert. .Pic: Vikki Lince. (7917925)
Rhodes Arts Centre, Bishops Stortford. KS2 Schools concert. Pupils from Windhill21, Summercroft, St Andrews and St Michaels Primary schools taking part in concert. .Pic: Vikki Lince. (7917925)

Seren Stephen, a Year 12 student at Leventhorpe School in Sawbridgeworth, reports on a schools' concert at Rhodes...

Children from four primary schools came together as a colourful festival choir for a multicultural concert at Rhodes Art Complex.

The auditorium at Rhodes resembled a rainbow as Key Stage 2 pupils from St Michael’s, Summercroft and Windhill21 in Bishop's Stortford and St Andrew’s C of E in Much Hadham dressed in bright colours and waved an array of national flags.

The concert last Tuesday afternoon, which was performed in front of an audience of parents and carers, highlighted the variety of cultures and languages that are brought together by song.

Each school had its own performance slot. The event started with St Andrew’s pupils illustrating the colour and energy of Indian culture through Bollywood dance.

Next, St Michael’s children sang songs which reflected the mixed cultures in their own classrooms, followed by traditional Romanian and Bulgarian dances.

Summercroft singers performed a medley of three New Zealand songs delivered in the native Maori language.

Then Windhill21 wound up with a version of Billionaire by Bruno Mars, followed by a powerful song and talk tackling important issues such as pollution, poverty and climate change.

The four schools came together as the festival choir – directed by The Harmonaires adult choir director and primary school teacher Josie Cowley – and sang in a variety of languages and dialects, including a Portuguese lullaby and Ghanaian and Scottish melodies.

A song that consisted of the repeated lines “We all dance to different drums, no two heartbeats are the same, we all live under the same sun, but we have different rhythms to play” captured the overall purpose of the concert: that song and melody bring cultures together.

The performance ended with a harmonious rendition of Sing, written by Gary Barlow and Andrew Lloyd Webber for the Queen's Diamond Jubilee in 2012, in which the flags of various countries were raised high for all to see.



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